1930's Hollywood showroom

  • Josh Malks
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28 Dec 2010 04:13 #18925 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic:
Nope, never visited Tremulis's shop. Did visit with him and Chrissie at his home in Ventura. The last time he was deep in the throes of Alzheimer's.

Very talented designer, very talented crafsman, very talented storyteller.

Josh B. Malks
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www.automaven.com

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  • balinwire
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29 Dec 2010 22:43 #18930 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic:
Wow! That must have been a very enlightening visit.
To have these giants of design working in the same Auburn studio building cars.
At least we still have examples of their art to enjoy.
The only time I met anyone of that stature was completely by accident. I was called to the Santa Monica home of Dutch Darrin to do some work. We chatted all day about old cars and he told me of his whole life in styling.
He was also ill and when I returned at a later time I was greeted by his son with the news.
Anyway, I was listening to 1950's music, a change from the 1940's Horace Heidt, Harry James, Glenn Miller that sound so good around the old cars.
It got me to thinking of what the cars may have evolved into. Not so much the Duesenberg 1963 but a fifties version.
The song Dream Lover by Bobby Darin was playing.
He only lived to age 37. He bought the DiDia 150. Quote," Darin's car was built by Detroit native and clothing designer Andy DiDia; the car took seven years, from 1953 to 1960, to finish. Two engines are listed as power plants; I assume the present 427 came later. Originally the car cost $153,647.29 to create; today it's worth $1.5 million."
It has an instrument control cluster that looks as if it was inspired by the Cord 810 dash levers. Hidden headlights possibly inspired by the original Cord design <!-- s:?: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_question.gif" alt=":?:" title="Question" /><!-- s:?: -->

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29 Dec 2010 23:50 #18931 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic:
I just saw this on a metal kiddy lunchbox.
The 1976 Star Wars landspeeder is a copy of the DiDia. Cord in the future.

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22 Feb 2011 17:20 #19354 by memaerobilia
memaerobilia replied the topic:
Anyone know E.L.Cord's exact title, in relation to his ownership of The Pan-Pacific Auditorium? The Henderson Brothers, Cliff and Phil (who also ran the huge National Air Races, numerous other auto and aviation events, basketball games, Ice Capades, even major planning roles in the Los Angeles Olympics, and many other Extravaganzas.) had the Pan-Pacific Village, including the Pan-Pacific Auditorium, designed. They had it built in 1935, and it was reported sold to E.L. Cord in 1937. I have several cartons of Cliff Henderson's original archives, full of original Pan-Pacific design photos, and financial reports (It generated hundreds of thousands of dollars profit, during the Depression) But in the reports, photos and programs for all these major events held there, there is usualy at least a full page with the "views" of Pan Pacific Auditorium Prorgrams with Cliff as President and Managing Director, and Phil as Vice President and Business Manager, all the way through the forties. So is it safe to assume that Cord was jut the "owner" and had no "active" role in the auditorium? Cliff has "E.L. Cord" as one of the listees in his personal phone book/directory, as early as a dated page for November 1930. Cliff Henderson owned or used (or had promotional loan of) at LEAST 20 different magnificent Cords and Auburns, using them extensively for his personal use, or as V.I.P. vehicles and parade cars for many of the earlier years of the 1929-1939 National Air Races. A couple of 8 x 10 photos show groups of three-four open Cords & Auburns together in parades, and possibly MORE in the backgrounds.From L-29s, to various open Cords and special Auburn Speedsters, with famous air racers, especially the rare photos of the Cords with famous Women pilots and air race winners. Sometimes called "The Master of Ballyhoo" he had professional photographic records and press releases of many of these Cords and Auburns at the races with such as Mary Pickford, Governors etc etc. *They even had novelty races of "mini" Auburns, at the National Air Race events. He said it took a combined effort of 7000 people to put on the national Air Races, and a healthy proportion of the prize money and support services came from ALL of the big names in the oil companies of the time. so LOTS of great photos of the various Oil Company fuel trucks servicing not only the race planes, but "Giving the Cord a drink." too. The original 80 year old photos are so sharp that one can read the license plates easily, on many of them, which greatly helps with dating them!
But it would appear that Cord left all Pan-Pacific Auditorium matters in the very capable hands of the Henderson Brothers. Still have more boxes to go through. Acquired 400 lbs of Hendersons material, years ago.

Joe G.
hundreds of our early photos or planes, racecars, customs classics @ www.memaerobilia.com

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23 Feb 2011 02:21 #19361 by RandyEma
RandyEma replied the topic:
Joe. I visited with Charles Cord several times and the family owned the Pan Pacific during all those years of visits . One thing I remember Charles telling me was it was cost more for a new roof which was shot than the property was worth at the time. I think it was around 1938 that Cord bought contoling intrest in it. Randy

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25 Feb 2011 16:03 #19388 by memaerobilia
memaerobilia replied the topic:
Randy;
No surprise that once the wooden roof started to deteriorate from age, that renovation costs might be impractical. I've been reading through all this material, and it is amazing what could be done in those days. The Pan Pacific Auditorium (there were a whole range of OTHER major buildings in the Pan Pacific Village complex, such as the bowling alley, theater, ice rink arena etc etc) was constructed in 1000 hours! Only six weeks time from breaking ground to ready to open for the first Exhibition in 1935! At roughly 110,000 sq ft, it was the third largest auditorium in U.S. It was booked solid, for years, and most of the basketball games, hockey games, Ice Follies etc were sold out events. Two of the (Many) Annual events were the Automobile Show and the Aircraft & Boat Show. I have a whole album of 8 x 10 professional photographs of the Aircraft and Boat Show. Alas, I do not see a similar album for any of the Auto shows.. Here is a circa 1940 image from one of the Auditorium's brochures. (There is even a 1943 Original UNCASHED! check in the PP Auditorium files, for $1000! Fun stuff!) But cannot find Cord info?yet..

Joe G.
hundreds of our early photos or planes, racecars, customs classics @ www.memaerobilia.com

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