Duesenberg Model J Leaf Spring Restoration

More
18 Apr 2011 00:40 #19836 by gkit
gkit created the topic: Duesenberg Model J Leaf Spring Restoration
I'm new to posting questions on line and I'm new to this web site, but I'm not new to the wonderful world of Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg automobiles. Please correct any of the following points that I will be making if I am wrong. On Page 285 of Fred Roe's book, "Duesenberg-The Pursuit of Perfection" he states that the spring leaves of the Model J were "polished". I have read in other sources that Fred Duesenberg himself was concerned about the J's spring rates and took it upon himself to tweak them during the car's development. Part of his solution was to plate and polish each leaf, lubricate them and ensure the retention of the oil and elimination of dirt and dust by wrapping the springs in leather "gaiters". Most restored Duesenberg Model J's that I've examined have had painted springs with no gaiters. Which is the correct way to restore the springs? Also, did the "Bijur" lubrication system lubricate the springs?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
19 Apr 2011 00:37 #19842 by RandyEma
RandyEma replied the topic:
Original model J spring leaves were polished to a fairly coarse finish greased and after assy painted almost never covered and there was no Bijur to the leaves . Randy

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
19 Apr 2011 13:36 #19848 by gkit
gkit replied the topic:
Randy, thanks very much for your reply. Gary

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Bob Roller
  • Bob Roller's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Frequent Forum Contributor
  • Frequent Forum Contributor
More
19 Apr 2011 17:18 #19850 by Bob Roller
Bob Roller replied the topic: Greasy springs/Bijur oiler
When I was working in the garage where our "J"work was done,we had a grease rack which was part of the gas station part of the business and any number of people would ask to have the "Springs sprayed". This was done by mixing a light oil with kerosene and then by using an air powered spray gun to do the job. Sort of messy but it was part of a 1950's style "grease job".
On the Duesenberg,the Bijur system lubed the spring shackles as well as the clutch linkage plus a few other things but not the springs.
I had a 1935 Packard convertible coupe that had a one shot oiler with a pull handle under the dash to activate it. I think it was also a Bijur item and I recall buying Bijur oil at Huntington Forge and Machine shop,
My current car,a Lincoln Town Car has about 4 fittings for grease (maybe) and I have to raise the roof with the people at the oil change shop to get them serviced,
These shops are taking pride in speed and if something is done right,you must insist on it.

Bob Roller

Bob Roller

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.079 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum