truing bent wheels

  • balinwire
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07 Dec 2003 15:02 #1093 by balinwire
balinwire created the topic: truing bent wheels
It?s getting into the thirties down here and the cars are running rough, now I see the need for carburetor de-icing manifolds.

I have never givin much consideration to valve overlap in the timing. I could see where this could give more engine efficiency.

I see that www.egge.com is making pistons for old cars. I wonder if they do ACD cars? Would it be practical to cast an entire replacement FB Lycoming block?

It could have the original profile on the outside but have modern cranks, cams and pistons from Ford or Chevy. Maybe even an extreme example with overhead valves or overhead cam. No forget that, only a flathead version with over the counter insides would be acceptable.
Oh forget that idea also, just a block and grind a new crank as original. Silly thought but just trying to keep em rolling. There are Harley Davidson replacement engines that have all Chevy parts inside! I could set my stock lycoming on a bench and drive the modern engine all I wanted with worrying I was damaging a good original.

My wheels seem to have a 5/8? solid center. I was thinking this might have been a reweld.
Did the original heavy wheels have a stamped center like the light wheels? All the examples I have seen have been covered by hubcaps, which prevent further examination.

The reason I am concerned is that they have a minor sway when spun. I think they may have not been trued when the centers were welded in(could this have been an attempt to repair cracking or is this a stock wheel?) or bent when mounting of the tires occurred.

I have found a plating shop that may be able to straiten them and then send them to the power coating plant for paint.

I need a good explanation of the two types of wheels and there differences in metal thickness and overall offsets and type of materials used. I have heard they were of an inferior metal or is this just rumor?

Merry Christmas to everyone, from balin?

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11 Dec 2003 01:06 #1106 by Tom Georgeson
Tom Georgeson replied the topic:
I just bought a set of Cord pistons and rings from Egge. Look nice. They have valves, springs, guides, valve lifters (what ever they mean these items to be I don't know), also will babbitt mains and rods, have timing chains and gasket sets.
Stick with the Cord engine, it really is a good one when properly set up which includes a full flow oil filter.

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26 Jan 2004 01:14 #1235 by C Walker
C Walker replied the topic: 810 Steel Wheels
I have 3 spare wheels from a '36 Phaeton that I just stripped and primed (I'm planning to sell them to help finance other parts I need). I just inspected and measured one and found the following. First of all, the wheel was manufactured in 3 pieces, the rim, the hub, and the hub cap flange. The rim is riveted to the hub with 12 flanged hot worked rivets, the rim is butt welded, and the hub flange is spot welded with eight 1/4" spot welds.

The rim measures 0.128" - 0.131", the hub is nominally 0.200" but thickens up to 0.235" at the lug holes from the action of the punch press, The edge of the rim and the hub flange both measured0.130". I didn't find any area thicker than the metal at the lug holes (0.235") and there is no sign of welding other than that already mentioned.

I hope this helps but if you need specific measurements Email me and I get them for you.

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  • Josh Malks
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26 Jan 2004 14:31 #1240 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic: Wheels
1. In answer to balin's question, the original wheel centers were all intricately stamped. A solid wheel center means a past effort to save a broken wheel.

2. Cord wheels came in at least [i:3cjev6m2]THREE[/i:3cjev6m2] different thicknesses, in two different designs. If you intend to drive the car don't consider rolling on anything but the "heavy" design, and the later thicknesses.

3. Most wheels can be straightened, but final tolerances should permit no more than .060 axial runout (wobble) and .060 radial runout (hop). And those are high.

4. If you plan to run radial tires have the wheels beadblasted (paint covers a multitude of sins) and professionally checked (dye indicator or Magnaflux) for cracks between the center holes [i:3cjev6m2]and around the rim[/i:3cjev6m2]. The rim takes most of the added stress caused by the radials, and remember that you're starting with a rim that's nearly seventy years old to begin with.

5. More on wheels and tires coming up over the next several Newsletters.

Josh B. Malks
810 2087A
ACD Club Life Member
ACD Newsletter editor
Past president
www.automaven.com

Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

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11 Mar 2004 01:30 #1407 by PushnFords
PushnFords replied the topic: Re: truing bent wheels

balinwire wrote: My wheels seem to have a 5/8? solid center. I was thinking this might have been a reweld.
Did the original heavy wheels have a stamped center like the light wheels? All the examples I have seen have been covered by hubcaps, which prevent further examination.

The reason I am concerned is that they have a minor sway when spun. I think they may have not been trued when the centers were welded in(could this have been an attempt to repair cracking or is this a stock wheel?) or bent when mounting of the tires occurred.

I have found a plating shop that may be able to straiten them and then send them to the power coating plant for paint.


My understanding is that the wheel bolts have a habit of loosening and then will crack or pull through when they get loose enough. There are quite a few wheels around with welded in centers for a repair.

Check around with aftermarket wheel suppliers for good places to straighten wheels. I take mine to a guy that mainly does 18"+ aftermarket aluminim wheels. I haven't used the wheels I had repaired but his shop is always full of bent wheels so I assume he knows what he is doing! He charges $15 to straighten a steel wheel.

Derek

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12 Mar 2004 18:46 #1410 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic: wheel wobble
That seems like a very fair price. the quote I got was 165$ per wheel to true them and I will have to have the new tires remounted and replaced on my own.

I did not see they had a wobble till the new tires would not balance. I will check around wheel shops again. I was thinking maybe a set of Toranado wheels with 15 in tires may work in a pinch.

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