Join ACD Club

You do not need to own an ACD automobile to become a member! Just an interest! You’ll receive ten issues per year of our award-winning newsletter which is full of articles, photos, and buy/sell ads for Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg automobiles. You get special access to our members-only areas on our forums. You can also attend any of our meets and bring your guests.

Ready to join the ACD Club? We hope so!

You can use our safe and secure website to start your membership. You can use your Visa or Mastercard. In addition, you may add your vehicle information for multiple automobiles.

Harry Denhard had an idea. In 1952, he lived in the town of Greenville in upstate New York, and owned an Auburn Speedster. He has previously owned a Duesenberg Model J, and a Cord 812. There wasn’t much accurate information available in those days about the orpans of E.L. Cord’s automotive empire and what there was, was often inaccurate. Few car owners knew any other owner, and little technical information or assistance was available. Harry thought that owners and fans might want to help each other preserve and maintain these magnificent relics of America’s automotive past. So he placed an ad in Motor Trend magazine, seeking such kindred spirits. The 35 people who responded became the nucleus of the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club.

Our Cars

The Auburn automobile was manufactured by the Auburn Automobile Company of Auburn, Indiana from 1903 to 1936. The most familiar Auburns were made in the final six years of production. The Duesenberg automobile was manufactured between 1921 and 1937. Again, it is the Model J of 1929 on that most people remember. The front wheel drive Cord automobile was made in two series – the L-29 of 1929 to 1932, and the V8-powered 810 and 812 in 1936 and 1937.The reason that these final years of manufacture shine so brightly in the automotive firmament is that it was during this period that the companies were guided by the entrepreneurial hand of Errett Lobban Cord.

Cord, who ran the Auburn Automobile Company from 1924 to 1932, built the little firm into a manufacturing powerhouse. in 1929 he bought the struggling Duesenberg company and folded its stock into Auburn. Same for engine-builder Lycoming Manufacturing. In that same year he created the Cord Corporation, a holding company for Auburn and over 100 other enterprises, large and small. “Across the USA”, said a Time Magazine cover story in 1934, “stretched the Kingdom of Cord.”In terms of market caps, the car-building companies — Auburn and it Deusenberg subsidiary — were tiny. Still, the cars they produced are today among the best known and visually stunning in the world. It is fair to say that no two car compaines — anywhere, anytime — incorporated more new concepts into their products over a period of so few years.

The Auburn V12 sold for half the price of competitive V12s, and went on to power fire engines for many years. The Duesenberg’s double overhead cam straight eight was the most powerful engine in any American car out of its era. The Cord L-29 was the first American production front drive car. The Cord 810 sported the world’s first retractable headlights, as well as the first “step-down” floor. The Duesenberg Model A introduced four-wheel hydraulic brakes to the automotive world in 1921. And the Cord 810 and 812 are still regarded by stylists as among the most beautiful cars built anywhere anytime.The ACD Club is very proud of the history of the cars it celebrates. 

Read More History of the Auburn Automobile Company and its cars

Auburn Cord 1
Auburn Cord 2
Auburn Cord 3

The Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club

Harry Denhard had an idea. In 1952, he lived in the town of Greenville in upstate New York, and owned an Auburn Speedster. He has previously owned a Duesenberg Model J, and a Cord 812. There wasn’t much accurate information available in those days about the orpans of E.L. Cord’s automotive empire and what there was, was often inaccurate. Few car owners knew any other owner, and little technical information or assistance was available. Harry thought that owners and fans might want to help each other preserve and maintain these magnificent relics of America’s automotive past. So he placed an ad in Motor Trend magazine, seeking such kindred spirits. The 35 people who responded became the nucleus of the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club.

As the club grew, volunteer technicians stepped forward to help club members deal with the rebuilding and maintenance of their cars. Historians recorded and preserved the histories of the cars and the companies that made them. A monthly publication begun as mimeographed sheets became an informative magazine.The first weekend gathering of members and their ACD cars took place in the hamlet of Avon, Pennsylvania in 1955. The club’s activities have since grown to encompass regional “meets” taking place from spring through fall in all parts of the country.The club’s enthusiasm helped galvanize new interest in the nearly-forgotten product of the Auburn Automobile Company. In 1956 the ACD Club organized a “Reunion” in Auburn, Indiana. Centerpiece of the event was the former administration building of the Auburn Automobile Company. The building was then occupied by the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Company which had been selling parts and services since the Auburn Automobile Company had ceased production in 1937.

To the surprise of the organizers (and of the city of Auburn) 600 enthusiasts and their cars attended. The event grew, and 13 years later the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Festival was created by the city to help coordinate the weekend’s activities. The former company headquarters building was purchased by a local not-for-profit organization to house the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum, today one of the premier museums of its kind in the world.The Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club grew from small beginnings. Harry Denhard had dubbed it “an organization for the restoration and preservation of Auburn, Cord and Deusenberg automobiles.” The club has accomplished those goals. Even more important, it has created bonds of friendship among enthusiasts of these cars that have enriched their lives.

History written by Josh Malks, ACD Club Newsletter Editor.