Carburator leaks

  • ilikescars
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05 Jan 2008 16:03 #9092 by ilikescars
ilikescars created the topic: Carburator leaks
Whenever I've seen engine compartment photographs, it's hard not to notice that on most cars, there is evidence of gasoline seepage around the carbs.
There is one small leak that may be overlooked and is easy to fix on the Stomberg: the Float Fulcrum pin. This is the small brass screw that is next to the gas inlet. I noticed a small amount of gas seeping out from around this screw on my carb. I simply removed the screw, applied a small amount of clear Seal-All to the threads and reinstalled. No more leak.

Mark

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  • mikespeed35
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06 Jan 2008 06:08 #9101 by mikespeed35
mikespeed35 replied the topic:
Thanks for the tip. I will seal it, but will use locktite med strength.
CORDially Mike

Mike Huffman

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28 Mar 2009 17:53 #13046 by ilikescars
ilikescars replied the topic: More leaks resolved
I was wondering why it took so long to start my 36 Auburn after it had been sitting for as little as two weeks. I would crank my engine until I realized it wasn't gonna start, and finally, I would resort to squirting a little gas into the carb.
Now, I have figured it out: The gasoline in the float bowl was seeping out through the main discharge jet plug (the brass plug at the bottom of the bowl) and the seepage was almost undetectable. In other words, the bowl was dry, and the slow engine cranking would not allow the mechanical fuel pump to replenish the bowl.
Repairing the leak turned out to be frustrating, until I realized that the plug was bottoming-out on the main jet, and couldn't be tightened all the way down on the small fiber gasket. Simple solution: add a soft copper washer on top of the fiber washer. This allowed the plug to seat properly on the gasket. Leak has been stopped, and the bowl is always full for the next start-up!

I hope this helps some of the die-hards (like me) that don't want to use an electric fuel pump.

Mark

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