1930's Hollywood showroom

  • balinwire
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24 Dec 2010 19:34 #18891 by balinwire
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Would you fair to say this was an 810 model in 1936? The tire carrier looks like it was well done. The trunk bracket looks like a gas filler neck attached to the trunk skin when the tire is lowered. Was there a good survival rate on these carriers on the sedans and how many still exist? The interior of the trunk seems muck larger without the spare. All the tire carrier parts appear to be bolt on.
A trunk or spare tires and side pipes on a luxury car in the thirties was a considered a special treat to view. Looking at the amount of cars from the thirties with hump trunks they seemed to be preferred by buyers.
The Cord bustle trunks that were designed after the accessory bolt on trunks and designed by Alex Tremulis creator of the Tucker seem to mimic a tire carrier.
Trunks must have been favored by buyers as it was popular with buyers of the 812 Beverly. Possibly inspired somehow by how well the spare was carried on this model.
I was pondering the question of reversing the bumperettes. Cord never considered the car in the rear view mirror. The Cord was the only car on the road. Now consider the car on an assembly line. The front bumper is 12". The rear would be slightly higher 14", especially in the 812 with the extra leaf. So if a Cord front bumper would bump a Cord rear bumper it would not travel underneath. Locking and possibly damaging the rear fairing and bending the spare wheel. So reverse the bumperettes preventing under travel? Fun to speculate. <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> notice how the taillights are not in the lid... http://www.coachbuilt.com/des/t/tremulis/tremulis.htm

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  • Josh Malks
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24 Dec 2010 20:13 #18892 by Josh Malks
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This a probably a 1937 812, not an 810. Lots of photos indicate that the bumper guards on the 812s were installed pointing down.

The taillites had to be outboard in order for the rear spare to work. All 812 bustlebacks and some later 812 fastbacks had outboard lites. Seems unlikely that the dealer would do the needed bodywork to move the lites from the deck lid. So either the rear spare was a factory installation or the dealer kit could only be installed on a fastback with outboard taillites. More likely the latter.

The bustle trunks were added to provide some luggage space. This was the major customer complaint (bodywise) about the fastback sedans. The bustle trunks were hardly an improvement esthetically, IMHO.

Josh B. Malks
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  • Chris Summers
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24 Dec 2010 21:00 #18894 by Chris Summers
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I sometimes think I'm the only person who likes the bustlebacks (or humpbacks, as I usually accidentally call them). It comes from favoring Custom models, I think.

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24 Dec 2010 21:00 #18895 by balinwire
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Compared to the original Buehrig styling vision, it is an addition, but as an addition it is not an abomination as it could have been. The stock body?s were converted to ambulances and such. Had the company survived many models have come in other designs from the cowl back. I actually feel it is very attractive and well done in the light of 1937 styling. Usually different is better in the old car world and the bustle never seems to have endeared itself as a styling cue. They seem to have be the first body?s cannibalized, scrapped and ignored. The Tremlus connection is very forgiving as well. Not sporty but classy and very impressive to the untrained eye of doorman at the Copa.


http://www.conceptcarz.com/vehicle/body ... carID=9090



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25 Dec 2010 16:03 #18910 by Tom_Parkinson
Tom_Parkinson replied the topic: Bustle-back?
Hi,

I know this is all opinion and personal preference, but to me the flat back is the greatly better styling. It's the [i:lhegtdw5]flat-back [/i:lhegtdw5]that was born on the highway...



Anyway, who cares about minor issues such trunk space and convenience when you have a [i:lhegtdw5]CORD??[/i:lhegtdw5] :)

--Tom

With brakes, two cylinders are better than one.

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27 Dec 2010 23:27 #18923 by balinwire
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The fast back four door sedan used to appeal to me, but as I get older I prefer the four doors and the larger trunk. I cant even see it anymore. I guess thats why ice cream comes in two flavors.

Hi Josh, question, I saw mention of his shop here, http://wmspear.com/bill/Bantam/40hly.html
did you ever get to see Tremulis' Beverly Hills shop and did you ever get to meet and interview him?

< Tremulis, Alexander Sarantos b. January 23, 1914 d. December 29, 1991>



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