Duesenbergs sold new to germany and Duesenberg bodied by Fig

  • Bob Roller
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02 Aug 2011 11:44 #20642 by Bob Roller
Bob Roller replied the topic: Duesenbergs in Europe
SJ542 was sold new in Paris and came to America before 1940. There was one,I think a Murphy CC that was commandeered by the Wehrmacht that belonged to the embassy of a country friendly to Hitler and those that did the commandeering got a stern letter ordering its return.The order was signed by Hitler himself. The D'Iteren Freres bodied car was obviously Eurpean and the man that I asked about it at Auburn had no idea when it came to America. He may not have been the owner and was only showing the car for whoever did own it. It had a steel body instead of aluminum.
J159 was photgraphed at Motor DeLux and it was a Barker Town Car with right hand drive. I have seen it at Auburn on different occassions.
Not all European sales of Duesenbergs involved European coach work and were cars finished here and shipped to France ready to go.
I once read an article about the oil that was available there and there were reports of bearing failures because it was not up to the job of properly lubricating the engine.Any know anything about this?? I think I gave the magazine to Chris.

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03 Aug 2011 02:03 #20646 by cstebbins
cstebbins replied the topic:
Here's Hilla.

This certifies that this Cord automobile has been driven 110.8 miles per hour before delivery - Ab Jenkins

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  • Josh Malks
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03 Aug 2011 17:30 #20648 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic:
landmark is quite right. From 1940 on the US tried to walk a thin line between supporting Great Britain and declaring war on Germany.

Bauer first inquired about a Duesenberg chassis in March 1937. He came to the US (to stay) in March 1938 when the chassis was supposed to be shipped to Germany, but wasn't. This was 18 months before WWII began with Hitler's attack on Poland. Roosevelt hated Hitler, and the feeling was certainly mutual. But when Rudolf Bauer bought his Duesenberg chassis the war in Europe had not yet begun.

'Nuff history. Back to Duesenbergs.

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03 Aug 2011 20:02 #20649 by Bob Roller
Bob Roller replied the topic: History/Zeitgeschichte
Zeitgeschichte,the face or story of time.In the days of E.LCord's auto/industrial empire,sinister events were transpiring and anyone who won't learn from them may damned well have to relive them. ONE major financial catastrophe and the party restarts all over again. What happened to and IN the auto industry were certainly entertwined when America did get involved in WW2 officially after Pearl Harbor. The independent makers,Packard,Nash.Hudson,Studebaker,Willys were all heavily engaged in war production. Notably absent was Cord's industrial empire. Duesenbergs made a small contibution in the well known Pratt&Whitney tests but only 4 cars were involved but the production of the powerful "J" engine was over and no chance of revival.
Packard furnished 55,000 V12 aircraft engines and several thousand more V12 marine engines and possibly some air cooled radial engines as well. Studebaker kept our military and the Russians supplied with reliable trucks.Hudson and Nash made fuselage sections for heavy bombers that rolled out of Ford's Willow Run plant at the rate of one per hour, Willys produced the ubiquitous "JEEP" and I worked on more that one of them in my Army days(1954-1963)
Field Marshall Rommel, in a frank talk with Hitler said that "When the industrial power of America shows up on any battles we are engaged in,we have lost with no hope of victory later".Of course Hitler blew up right on cue.
There is plenty of room for history on these forums and the story of the American automobile is one of free wheeling enterprise and a "Get out of the way"attitude that is sadly lacking today.
Zuviele zeitgeschichte ist nicht genug,Nicht Wahr?

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03 Aug 2011 20:11 #20650 by Chris Summers
Chris Summers replied the topic:
Hilla looks like an interesting sort, doesn't she? Monied arts patron of the 1930s personified.

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03 Aug 2011 20:35 #20651 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic:
Bob's comments are important and accurate.

It's true that E.L. Cord was no longer involved with the companies that had comprised his automotive empire. But they went on contributing to the war effort by themselves.

Central Manufacturing Company of Connersville, IN was a subsidiary of the Auburn Automobile Company. They stamped the body parts for late Auburns and Cord 810/812 and assembled both cars. Central continued making sheetmetal parts and assemblies as sub-contractors until the war, and bomber nacelles and wing parts-- including wings for the B-24 -- after 1941. In 1942 it changed its name to American-Central.

And, while most folks think of Jeeps as being Willys or Ford products, in fact those companies only built the chassis. The bodies -- 445,000 of them -- were made by Central in Connersville and came down the same assembly lines down which Cords had come only a few years earlier. Finished bodies were shipped to Toledo and Dearborn for mounting on the chassis. Central built 200,000 Jeep trailers, too.

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