Duesenbergs in Argentina

  • West Peterson
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20 Oct 2010 18:37 #18233 by West Peterson
West Peterson replied the topic:

Chris Summers wrote: Snarky irony, West...snarky irony.

And yes, that is J-292, although it now has chassis 2606 and the body is partially a replica. The original body was badly butchered and the original frame shortened while the car was still in Argentina.

That sounds a lot like the history of the mostly reproduced body currently on J-275, also a LeBaron sweep-panel phaeton (where is that car today, by the way?).

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20 Oct 2010 18:52 #18234 by Chris Summers
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It's on public display, although for most of us it would be a bit of a trek to see it. It is in the Toyota Museum in Japan, misidentified as a Murphy body.

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20 Oct 2010 19:23 #18235 by alsancle
alsancle replied the topic:
292 wasn't my Uncle Ted's car was it?

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20 Oct 2010 19:40 #18236 by Bob Roller
Bob Roller replied the topic: South American Duesenbergs
Wasn't J275 one of the fabric bodied cars like J251 and as I recall.belonged to a man by the name of Resnick or Renic in California? It was rebodied into a DCP and painted yellow and white. I heard that Toyota had bought it to study the engine and to see how so much power could be gotten from such a low compression ratio.
I think I saw J292 at Auburn in 1986 and was told it came up from South America as a basket case. I also recall the intake manifold looked like it came from a plumbing shop and I THINK it had a supercharger. I saw it again in 1992 at Auburn and they couldn't get it started to use in the parade.

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20 Oct 2010 19:44 #18237 by Chris Summers
Chris Summers replied the topic:
The Toyota Museum car was built for and belonged to Phil Renick. It uses engine J-275, frame 2359, and the remnants of J-392 / 2359's LeBaron body, with the rest of the body built up around that. I hadn't heard the story about buying it to study the engine before...I just might look into buying a Corolla now. :D

Yes, A.J., that was Ted Billings's car, the one you remember as black and gold, I think?

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21 Oct 2010 15:25 #18242 by alsancle
alsancle replied the topic: Re: South American Duesenbergs

Bob Roller wrote: Wasn't J275 one of the fabric bodied cars like J251 and as I recall.belonged to a man by the name of Resnick or Renic in California? It was rebodied into a DCP and painted yellow and white. I heard that Toyota had bought it to study the engine and to see how so much power could be gotten from such a low compression ratio.
I think I saw J292 at Auburn in 1986 and was told it came up from South America as a basket case. I also recall the intake manifold looked like it came from a plumbing shop and I THINK it had a supercharger. I saw it again in 1992 at Auburn and they couldn't get it started to use in the parade.

Bob Roller


Bob, J292 was Ted Billing's car. He purchased it around 1965 from South America via Nyak NY. My dad was standing here when the car came off the trailer. It was actually very complete except for 1 thing, the frame was shortened and it had a speedster style body from the back edge of the front doors. It was actually very stylish and well done and my dad told Ted he should leave it alone. My understanding is that the car had been used extensively for racing. The cowl, front doors, fenders, hoods, grills shell, etc, where all there. The engine had a dual carb blower on it. This was at least 10 years before Leo started reproducing them. Ted was told by Ray Wolfe that this engine was one of the spares to the Mormon Meteor that has been shipped down to South America in the 1930s. I have a bunch of pictures somewhere that I will try to dig up and post.

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