Radials or bias tires for my 35 s/c auburn driver?

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18 Dec 2006 22:34 #5956 by acdclubadmin
acdclubadmin replied the topic:

Mike Dube wrote: I wonder how some insurance companies would handle a claim due to wheel failure with radials mounted on non radial wheels?


Call your insurance company and have them fax you an answer. Put it in your insurance folder.

Bill Hummel - Webmaster - ACD Club

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18 Dec 2006 23:50 #5957 by
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I thought I'd add my 2 cents. If you are driving go with the radials, you will see a major difference in the car in the first mile!! I've had one season oon the Coker tires on my Cord and they work fine. I liked the fact they are 6.50 X 16 rather then being close. I have heard a couple of people complain about the whitewalls on the Diamonds turning brown on them (but on one tire out of four).

Regarding using radials on wheels made for bias ply tires. As long as the wheel is in good shape I wouldn't worry about it for a couple of reasons. First, back in the days when our cars were new the engineers of the time didn't have good ways to calculate the stress on the wheels to the anything that resembled a close value. They made a lot of assumptions, a few guesses and plugged it into a slide rule and hoped the numbers worked out OK.

Second, the metalurgy in that time frame wasn't anywhere near as good as it was later. If you order carbon steel the strength would very considerably from one heat of steeel to the next.

To compensate for this the engineers used large safety factors (that is they added a lot of extra meat) Just look at the weight of one of our wheels to a wheel from the 1960's or today. Yes tehy did goof every now and then and you will find "known problems" on some of the designs (look at the first liberity ships), but if our cars don't have a problem with the wheels splitting apart I wouldn't worry about it...also some of our members have a considerable amount of miles on the radials and I haven't heard of any reported problems. ONE NOTE I would be very leary of putting a radial in a car from the late 1950's or '60's that were designed with the bias ply tires...by then the designers had sharper pencils.

So drive the car and enjoy!!!

Jim

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19 Dec 2006 01:11 #5958 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic:
Jim, I had heard that the Coker radials had a rather narrow sidewall. Can you show us a photo and give the dimension?

Thanks.

Josh B. Malks
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19 Dec 2006 01:13 #5959 by Josh Malks
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Re: sealing spokes. My tire guy, J.B. Wire Wheels in Santa Cruz CA uses a gunky black stuff that he paints on. He used it on my Cord wheel's rivets too, just to be on the safe side.

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19 Dec 2006 01:48 #5962 by ilikescars
ilikescars replied the topic: Bias ply
Hey, guys: I have newer bias ply tires on my Auburn, installed by the former owner. I noticed that some of them have a large quantity of balancing weights on the inside of the rim. Has anyone ever heard of a method of balancing tires wherein the tires are "shaved"? I think it's done with large trucks. Just wondering...

Mark

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19 Dec 2006 06:18 #5966 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic:
Many collector car tires used to come from their overseas plants seriously out-of-round. (Even some commercial tires may not have been perfect.) Such tires were difficult to balance, requiring lots of weight. So many tire shops carried machines that trued the tire by shaving off rubber until it was perfectly round.

Trouble was that unless the machine itself was perfectly true, its products never could be. And many such machines were thrown into dark corners after each use until they were needed again, and never rechecked after they were purchased.

Hard to find these today, and even harder to know if they work properly.

Josh B. Malks
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Past president
www.automaven.com

Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

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