L-29 Differential

  • K Clark
  • K Clark's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • ACD Club Member
  • ACD Club Member
More
01 Feb 2004 21:32 #1280 by K Clark
K Clark created the topic: L-29 Differential
To Whom ever;
I just got through cleaning another L-29 Cord differential, again it did not have any green paint on it. I had noticed this on all the other differentials, that I have readied for restoration but, have painted them engine green,. Like most people have done. I do believe that they should be black as well as the stub axles. I also have a spare differential and it is also black.
Happy Motoring
Ken Clark

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Dick Greene
  • Dick Greene's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
15 Jun 2004 02:31 #1821 by Dick Greene
Dick Greene replied the topic: L-29 Differential Color
Ken, you are right and you are wrong. As with so many L-29 parts, color and finish varied as to the day of production and time during the production run.

Several years ago, Ken O'Connor and I tape-interviewed some former employees from the L-29 era. One said the engine came from Lycoming painted green and was mated with the bellhousing and differential in Auburn. Swinging from a chain, it was all shot with green paint. Makes sense.

As to the black ones, that is how the casting arrived in Auburn for assembly into a front-drive unit. There was a shortage of diffs in mid 1930 due to the vendor wanting to be paid up front. The factory assembled engine, clutch and trans, painted them, and then mated them to the black diff when they arrived.

Another method the black diff arrived on the L-29 was after an accident. That diff sticks way out in front and was the second line of defense during an impact. It was often cracked by the rearward movement of the tubular axle in a solid hit with another immovable object. The replacement would be black from the factory.

Who knows, and whatever. If you like it black, do so. I have a mix of both on my 13 L-29s. For the record, my 6754-mile totally original 1930 sedan has a black diff. My 1932 cabriolet has an original green diff. As for judging, I don't think it matters, as long as it isn't orange or whatever.

For the record, I was told by a painter at the factory and by a former Lycoming employee that the L-29 green became the Auburn V-12 green. Production ended on the L-29 12/31/31, and the V-12 Auburn came along shortly thereafter -- using the same color fit E.L.'s "waste not, want not" philosophy.

Dick Greene

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Auburn/Cord Parts
  • Auburn/Cord Parts's Avatar
  • Offline
  • ACD Club Life Member
  • ACD Club Life Member
More
15 Jun 2004 21:00 #1822 by Auburn/Cord Parts
Auburn/Cord Parts replied the topic: Engine Colors
This sort of comes under the "I beg to differ" but it's an old myth.

The Auburn V-12 engines are considered correct or authentic only when painted the dark olive green color like the 8 cyl. Lycoming series. For many years at least 2 vendors have sold the wrong color of green for the V-12. It's not even the L-29 Cord engine green. Many times, serious points have been counted off for unauthentic color of engine paint and everyone knows how hard it would be to repaint one in a restored car. the V-12 basic engine less carbs, dist., starter, fan was all painted gosh awful dark olive green. This was debated in the N/L many years ago by the V-12 boys. Then again 2 or 3 years ago, a V-12 engine judging detail article was published. Now, I agree that early engines could have been a different color. The V-12 in Paul Bryant's E-1 Cord was never the dark olive green but, it was a "Cord" not an Auburn.

I think Dick Greene has the correct response on L-29 differential colors. I've been keeping score and it's about neck and neck.

Stan

Auburn/Cord Parts, Inc. P.O. Box 547 1400 N. "A" St. Wellington, KS 67152 (620) 326-7751 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Dick Greene
  • Dick Greene's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
20 Jun 2004 23:06 #1842 by Dick Greene
Dick Greene replied the topic:
Stan may be totally correct on the dark V-12 engine color -- the one I owned for several years that is now owned (and greatly improved cosmetially) by Glen Petersen had a dark olive-tint green.

I have seen many other V-12s with the more "apple" green color -- a mid-shade between the dark Auburn and the Duesenberg greens. The "V-12 Auburn" color marketed by Bill Hirsch is very close to the original green on several original L-29s I own. However, the low mileage (6400+) sedan has a darker green, more like the V-12 green Stan refers to.

I don't doubt the retired painter from the days of the L-29, and there is always the distinct possibility, and maybe the probability, that there were several shades and hues of green used. I know of at least two colors, as I said, on original L-29 engines.

How do we settle it? Vote on it? I think I will begin a list of engine/serial numbers with the colors/shades and let's see where it goes.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
31 Mar 2010 15:25 #16266 by teq56
teq56 replied the topic:
for what it's worth my original auburn12 block was closest to the Ohio Bell telephone Green.. As mentioned. Gosh aweful olive drabe.

Thomas Quick.

Thomas Quick CFA.
Life Member
34 12 Salon Sedan
33 12 Salon Speedster
33 8 Salon Speedster
33 8 Convertible Sedan
31 L-29 Cord Phaeton
29 Duesenberg, Weymann St Cloud is Dad's!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.073 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum