L-29 exhaust pipe and C-pipe

  • K Clark
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23 Jan 2004 02:33 #1221 by K Clark
K Clark created the topic: L-29 exhaust pipe and C-pipe
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I'm in question to what kind of insulation wrap should be on the C-pipe and the header pipe of the L-29 Cord. I have seen all kinds. The first four L-29's that I restored I was able to get a woven sock. what I thought was the best, and the best looking, from Stan Gillian., but the next time I ordered the sock it was of a much larger weave, more difficult to put on but with a little pursistance I felt it looked fine. I have seen some with a two inch wide wrap, and some that look molded?. also should the wrap be brought all the way to the muffler or should it only go to the engine mount cross member?. What is the most exceptable or are all the different ways OK???
Thanks Ken Clark

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  • Auburn/Cord Parts
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23 Jan 2004 19:09 #1227 by Auburn/Cord Parts
Auburn/Cord Parts replied the topic: RE: L-29 exhaust pipe and C-pipe
The original material was asbestos and boiler plaster. None of the original materials are available today. We are forced to offer a Nomex glass woven sock which is different in appearance. It has always been acceptable in judging for the above reason wether we like it or not. Our government is protecting us to death.

Stan

Auburn/Cord Parts, Inc. P.O. Box 547 1400 N. "A" St. Wellington, KS 67152 (620) 326-7751 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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  • Dick Greene
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20 Jun 2004 23:22 #1844 by Dick Greene
Dick Greene replied the topic:
The C-shaped exhaust wrap on the L-29 was originally a 2" wide "lister wrap" which was then used on boilers. It was basically asbestos, which, as Stan says, has been removed to protect us. I always felt that if you didn't eat it, mix it with milk in a blender, and pretend it was spun cotton candy, it wouldn't hurt you. Granted, an overdose of anything will harm you, like drinking way too much water.

Anyway, back to the asbestos wrap. The original, 6400+ mile sedan we own has the 2" wrap with 48 turns, which ends about 8" short of the end of the pipe under the engine/trans mount. A clamp on each end with two intermediate hold it well. An old plumber told me the material was soaked in water first, then applied and allowed to dry. It took a shape to the pipe and stayed with the clamps.

The sock, or "Chinese finger bandage" looks great, and was found on my 1932 Cabriolet when I bought it in 1956 -- the car had been "repaired" not "restored", but probably had the sock put on in the '50s.

There are "asbestos-like" products available that really look the same as the original, especially after being heated by the hot exhaust pipe. If you opt for the sock, it is easier to apply, looks neater, but is not original.

Dick Greene

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  • K Clark
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21 Jun 2004 00:44 #1845 by K Clark
K Clark replied the topic: Technical Information
Thanks Dick and Stan for the input.
I like to do the most correct restorations possible. I agree with you both on the information, on the paints and exhaust wrapping.
Ken

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  • Al Hatch
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21 Jun 2004 19:14 #1852 by Al Hatch
Al Hatch replied the topic:
Ken,

Regarding the asbestos question; I have found that if you go to 'an older' hardware store they may have the asbestos wrap still sitting on the shelve. I recently found some at a local hardware and it was the type that had to be soaked in water before applying (I used it on the muffler of the S/C 812 Cord) and it just happen to be 2" wide.

Just another thought for you L-29 guys.

CORDially,

Al Hatch

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01 Feb 2006 09:02 #4307 by 1930 Jordan
1930 Jordan replied the topic: help with lister wrap and boiler plaster
I just found this web page and I think that I may have something that will work for the Boiler plaster and the Lister wrap. If some one could send me a sample of what the Lister wrap is to look like, I think that I may have something at work that may work for you L-29 owners. I have a 1930 Jordan great line 90, that I have been working on and have used some of the materials from work to wrap the last part of the header, and part of the pipe past the cowling area because this is right up against that area and gets real HOT. My floors are wood right there, I did not want any kind of fire with this car for their is only 8 1930 Jordan's, and this is one of the 3,1930 5pass sedans. I am a Engineer at a IL hospital and work with the boilers. I am around this kind of thing all day so if you think that I could help let me know. P.S. just love this sight- I have come away with LOTS of info that has helped me with LOTS of ???????? that I have had about the L-29's. I am hopping that one day I could afford to get one of the L-29. <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: -->

1930 Jordan"G" line 90,1953 Plymouth,1951 Chrysler Saratoga,1975 Dart,1974 Schwinn Collgate,1978 Schwinn Continental,1971 Honda 500"4",1973 Honda 350"twin",1975 Honda 500"twin",1955 Norton,1988 Honda Shadow custom,05 crossfire roadster.

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