Exhaust pipe insulation

  • Josh Malks
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22 Jun 2004 14:18 #1855 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks created the topic: Exhaust pipe insulation
This thread started out as a discussion of the exhaust insulation on the L-29. (That discussion is still in place at the L-29 Forum.) Then it moved on to a descussion of the 810/812 insulation, continued here.

The original asbestos covering on the exhaust pipes was still in place when I bought my Cord 810 in 1984. It was missing pieces here and there, but I maintained it as long as I could.

When it was in danger of disintegrating into flakes, I replaced it. While I don't claim any kind of prize-winning status, I can't agree with Stan that we can accept original appearance just because originality is hard to obtain. For my car we used a kaolin clay that's marketed in Hemmings for Cadillacs V-16s and such. It comes in a "blanket" about 1/4" thick, floating in a liquid to keep it soft. When molded onto the pipes, and after being cured by time and heat, it has an appearance and texture very much like the original asbestos/furnace cement combo. Unsupercharged Cords used pre-formed asbestos moldings that fit like clamshells over the front pipes, held on by sheetmetal clamps. The original was only about 1/8" thick, so we had to slim down the clay blanket.

I'm satisfied with the look, although it was a great deal of cost and effort for my non-competitive car. (Gets dirty too, if the car is drive a lot.) If anyone is interested, I can send a jpg. Also, I have a good deal of the clay material left, so if someone would like to experiment I can make it available for a pittance.

Josh B. Malks
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  • Auburn/Cord Parts
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22 Jun 2004 22:44 #1858 by Auburn/Cord Parts
Auburn/Cord Parts replied the topic: Exhaust Wrap: Another Concern
Many of the replacement exhaust pipe coverings draw moisture when they cool down, after use, especially in humid areas. Consequently, when you start up your engine, the header pipes or muffler gives off some moisture vapor until everything is up to working temperature. This sometimes causes concern.

My point on judging is that the exact original asbestos covering is no longer commercially available and substitutes have been used to affect the insulating benefit. I'm not aware of deductions for substitutions in this form. However, some do look more original than others.

Many of the Nomex socks will not expand enough to slide over the late L-29 Cord "C" shaped exhaust pipes. The bandage type of material can be installed after any flanges are in place.

Stan

PS - A nice tip for painting exhaust pipes is to clean well with solvents and use BBQ grill paint in spray cans or brush. They seem to outlast the expensive high temp. paints that are advertised.

Auburn/Cord Parts, Inc. P.O. Box 547 1400 N. "A" St. Wellington, KS 67152 (620) 326-7751 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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  • balinwire
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22 Jun 2004 23:17 #1860 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic: pipe wrap
The 812 Cord I am working on has a wrap of an unknown substance around the lower bend of the drivers side exhaust pipe. I did not know but I assumed it was asbestos and since it was not unraveling or deteriorating that it could stay, since it was original, or it sure looks like it has always been attached there with the two clamps mentioned. It looks like a dirty white mesh fabric 1/8in thick.

The reason it seems like original to me is that it protects the shifter and light wiring from the extreme heat of the pipe. There is very little clearance between the pipe and lower area with the radiator mount, less than an inch. It does offer some heat protection to some vital areas.

I like the idea of the replacing material. My question would be, is there any insulating value with this clay product. Also was there any insulation on the right exaust lower bend side as there is none on this car. There may be some other areas in the exhaust that have this wrap. Is this an area that is subject to judging?

I?ll bet there was an article on exhaust insulation in the newsletter sometime in the past. The un-supercharged cars had to route the large exhaust pipes thru some very close spaces under the hood. If the replacement clay product holds mosture it would also be a rust concern.

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  • Josh Malks
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23 Jun 2004 02:17 #1862 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic: Exhaust pipe insulation
The original asbestos moldings covered the pipes on the unblown cars from about 1/2" south of the gland nut that attaches them to the exhaust manifolds then downward to the bottom of the vertical section before the rearward curve begins.

The insulation value of this asbestos was as close to zero as you can get. It's purpose was to keep heat from being transferred to the radiator, and at this task it failed miserably. It was, after all, only 1/8" thick. So if you want to replace it, do so for looks only. And that means, in my book, try to get it to look as original as possible. Utility has it none.

Josh B. Malks
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  • balinwire
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24 Jun 2004 16:58 #1868 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic: Original as possible. Utility has it none.
If the insulation continues up to the connector nut, it is missing on this car and I will replace it with modern materials. I will try to find a suitable clamp of original type.

The porcelain exhaust manifold would also give off a tremendous amount of heat negating almost all heat protection the thin asbestos could provide from the radiator.

The insulating covering of the exiting exhaust down pipe would help prevent burns if one were to accidentally touch the large hot exhaust down pipe in checking fluids, etc.

Was the material an ?ace bandage? type of construction where it was wrapped in a circular way from top to bottom around the pipe and tied off with small flat cadmium straps?

The down tube would probably have to be dissembled from the exhaust nut and removed from the car to be recovered. The working area around the tube is very close to install the delicate fabric when the pipe is on the car and may present a challenge. The newly covered pipe could also be damaged reinstalling the pipe.

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  • Josh Malks
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24 Jun 2004 17:20 #1869 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic: Exhaust covering
The original covering was made in two pieces on each side --- 1 front, one rear --- total of four pieces. They were pre-molded from asbestos. To install, a pair were placed on each pipe, then four clamps were installed. The clamps were not hose clamps. but strap steel crimped at the joint.

Josh B. Malks
810 2087A
ACD Club Life Member
ACD Newsletter editor
Past president
www.automaven.com

Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

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