What is the definition of a "Hand-built" Cord?

  • Josh Malks
  • Josh Malks's Avatar
  • Offline
  • ACD Club Past President
  • ACD Club Past President
More
23 Apr 2004 17:13 #1636 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic: What to call the "handbuilts"?
The 100 Cords built by Auburn for the shows are generally called "handbuilts" and there is no way to change that anymore. As I've said, I call them "showcars". Maybe "pre-production" would have been the most correct title.

Stan is wise to distinguish these from the first six correctly named "prototypes". These cars were truly built by hand. The factory labelled these E-306. #1 was a hybrid; 810 sheet metal back to the cowl, Auburn body. #s 2 thru 6 were the first true 810 Cords. (It was #2 that took the shakedown cruise to Los Angeles in 1935.) While several of the "handbuilts" survive, not a single one of the "prototypes" is known to exist.

Josh B. Malks
810 2087A
ACD Club Life Member
ACD Newsletter editor
Past president
www.automaven.com

Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • balinwire
  • balinwire's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Frequent Forum Contributor
  • Frequent Forum Contributor
More
23 Apr 2004 20:35 #1637 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic: pre-pro
It is a tragic loss to have lost the first few prototypes. Was not one of the production cars reworked <for display>to look exactly like the first few prototypes with the inboard headlights and low windshield?

It would have been nice to have been an employee of The Auburn Motorcar Co. in 1937 and have had an option to buy one of the unsold show cars!

balin?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Josh Malks
  • Josh Malks's Avatar
  • Offline
  • ACD Club Past President
  • ACD Club Past President
More
23 Apr 2004 21:42 #1638 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic: Repro
Actually, one of the pre-production "handbuilts" was modified to replicate one of the prototypes --- inboard headlights, windshield lowered, etc. It belongs to Paul Bryant and has been on loan to the ACD Museum.

Josh B. Malks
810 2087A
ACD Club Life Member
ACD Newsletter editor
Past president
www.automaven.com

Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Auburn/Cord Parts
  • Auburn/Cord Parts's Avatar
  • Offline
  • ACD Club Life Member
  • ACD Club Life Member
More
30 Apr 2004 14:56 #1667 by Auburn/Cord Parts
Auburn/Cord Parts replied the topic: Re: first 100
Balin Wire-

I don't disagree with you on handbuilt Cords being interesting and more work to restore. We've worked on several including #5 with inboard headlamps and the bodies were made up of lots of small sections put together. However, value wise, they never bring as much because they are a little lumpy and rough around the edges. The company did finally turn an ugly duckling into a swan! Handbuilt Cords suffer in judging as well! I do not agree with the long standing transmission story. In interviews I made with old factory workers like Slim Davidson, Roy Weisheit, and Ed Rudd, all agreed that only a couple of open Cords had missing transmissions. They also said that just because the Sedans had transmissions, it didn't mean that they would work and this started the no transmission story among competitive auto manufacturers that perpetuate to this day. I can account for 17-20 handbuilt Cords in existance.

Stan


balinwire wrote: There was a recent newsletter that had some pictures and a description of the differences. Mostly in the door window profiles and I think the show open cars were buried in a levee!

tomscord is building a fabulous sedan, #18 I believe and it is the oldest know example remaining, I think. If a comparison could be considered, the oldest corvette known is appx. #5 and I know it is worth a considerable + premium. The last Camero was sold for a premium.

Considering how much more effort with the metal work, front splashes and the dash differences I would double a show cars value but the value is in what someone is willing to pay also. Some may want a production car as the parts were more uniform.

There were so few (appx 3000 total limited production) of the 810 +12 made I would consider all of them hand built cars and the first 100, hysterically hand built show cars for the 36 show deadline that was unachievable except for the dedicated Auburn staff, do you think the unions today would allow there member assemblers and drafting staff work 24 hours a day and sleep at there desks to meet the deadline?

Possibly an exaggeration but the staff was dedicated to meet the deadline possibly due to the horrible depression then and just glad to have a two-dollar a day job. I would love one of the surviving 100 but I love a challenge. How many of the 100 still remain?

balin?


Auburn/Cord Parts, Inc. P.O. Box 547 1400 N. "A" St. Wellington, KS 67152 (620) 326-7751 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Josh Malks
  • Josh Malks's Avatar
  • Offline
  • ACD Club Past President
  • ACD Club Past President
More
30 Apr 2004 15:48 #1668 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic: Missing transmissions
I've done my own part in perpetuating the "missing transmissions" urban legend, but have since "recanted". There is little question that all of the Cords at the shows had transmission HOUSINGS --- they were needed to hold up the front of the engine, and Lycoming/Spencer Heater had plenty of them. What is not known is how many, if any, had gears inside the cases.

Josh B. Malks
810 2087A
ACD Club Life Member
ACD Newsletter editor
Past president
www.automaven.com

Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.090 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum