Coil polarity

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28 Feb 2004 19:23 #1360 by Pat Leahy
Pat Leahy replied the topic:
As Josh mentioned, the best solution is to go to NAPA and purchase a new 6 volt coil and mount it in the car a describe in past Newsletter. A fresh coil and a cooler place should cure the problem

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29 Feb 2004 02:01 #1361 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic: not reversed polarity, but overheating coil
Wow, it just appeared to me why they mounted the coil inside the cabin. It is cooler than inside the engine compartment. I got to hand it to the early designers, they really knew there stuff.

Also as usual everything Auburn did was perfect and cannot be improved be modern day tinkering.

It is getting hot and electrically shutting down. I have seen that on modern automobile computers if they overheat. I always wondered why they dash mounted the coil, I thought it was for the Electrolock type coil. I?ll bet it was for a cool place to hide it also

Guess time to go to the tractor shop for a 6v. Fordson firewall mount, brand new. She's gonna purrrrr' now.

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11 Mar 2004 00:44 #1405 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic: follow up on electrical tuneup
I have been correcting the coil and another thing I have overlooked has been the plug wires and plugs. I now have 18 mm Champion H 8?s of unknown temperature but I think they run cold.
The original plugs were Champion H 10?s that had threaded plug wire ends <Top Type>and were black. These are not made currently <there is a huge demand, note to Champion>and the new H 10?s are H 10C?s that are silver in color and have clip on plug ends. These new plugs are probably resistor with a wider gap.
The closest plug I have been able to find is an H 8 Champion that has the correct narrow gap with the threaded wire end and may or may not be resistor.
This new plug that is such a perfect match except for the silver color. I would imagine the H10 of 1936 would be a 5,000 ohm plug. Could the new H8 be a 10,000-ohm plug that would be used with resistor wire? Is there an easy way to measure the resistance?
I have metallic high voltage wires. The total ohms in metallic wire and plug?s should be less than 5000 ohms.
A modern glass fiber and carbon cable should have no greater than 40,000 ohm?s and I would imagine they would degrade 6 v. performance.
I was next looking at the condenser. It causes the magnetic field of the coil to collapse creating the high voltage in the secondary windings. If the capacitor is incorrect or leaking it may also cause hard starting.
My car has not run long enough to see if the plugs run hot or foul. They have the usual carbon black coating from idling. A condenser can also result in short plug life if they are incorrect value.
The next area I will check in the ignition circuit will be the points and dwell.

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11 Mar 2004 01:25 #1406 by PushnFords
PushnFords replied the topic: Re: follow up on electrical tuneup
Balin-

If you go to the Champion website (and most other plug manufacturers) you will find a handy cross reference that also lists whether or not the plugs are resister. I've looked it up but can't tell you from memory what yours are. Autolite makes a black base plug or you might try lightly sandblasting and then use the cold blue stuff they sell for gun refinishing. It'll get you close to the correct look.

As for the plug wire ohms, I think you are a bit high. A good quality set of modern wires usually aren't over 10,000 ohms. I've seen cheap wires that will run around 15,000 but with a strong spark you will usually notice they are breaking down. I ohmed a lot of wires when I was changing a points car to electronic ignition. I was running a 40,000 volt coil, Pertronix, and Accel 8MM wires (black) and gapping the plugs at .050". It ran great but I went through several sets of wires before I found some that would last. On a solid strand wire like Cords use there is rarely over 500 ohms.

Derek

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12 Mar 2004 19:27 #1411 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic: plug info
That is a great idea about checking the Champion web page.

The web page for Champion is,
http://www.championsparkplugs.com/

This site is also very interesting, Federal Mogul.
http://www.federal-mogul.com/cda/site/b ... 01,00.html

They instantly found the H8 plug and it is a traditional plug, I guess this means old car. Go look at one and let me know what you think. Only 1.49.
It also said it was a resistor plug, very good page for plug questions, bookmark it.

That 40,000-volt Pertronix coil that you use can put out a spark! It must be a 12 v. system. No wonder the wires were breaking down. I am sure the 6v. Coil does not put out even half that much power.

The 812 service data chart of 1937 says the plug used should be a J9B with only a .025 ? gap. I have a lube chart that says use an H10 but that was probably a more available plug in the 40?s as it was used in the flathead Fords.

It did not occur to me to blast the plug and dye it. The Autolite replacement is black anodized but I did not like the large word Autolite printed on the porcelain area. It also did not have a screw end like the H8c.

I will also need to dial in the timing with a neon light with the timing marks and no 1# piston, front left, drivers side near bell housing? Like a Chevy V8.

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