engine temperature reductions

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26 Nov 2003 03:37 #1020 by Tom Georgeson
Tom Georgeson replied the topic:
When blocking off the water to the intake manifold you need to block off the outlet to the water pump. If it is not blocked off hot water will filter back into the manifold because of a small drilled hole, (1/4" or so) in the bottom of the manifold that is open to the water in the block. If you are blocking of the water to the intake manifold this also needs to be plugged. Drill it out and put a plug in it.

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26 Nov 2003 18:00 #1021 by Dave Henderson
Dave Henderson replied the topic:
Tom,
It wasn't I who was contemplating blocking off the intake manifold, did you send a message to Bailinwire, he spoke of doing it.
Anyhow, thanks for the info, I never noticed the 1/4" hole, will go up in the attic and look at a manifold. I seem to recall seeing a plug or two in the center, but they would be over the block cavity, not water
Dave

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02 Dec 2003 23:37 #1065 by leslie9958
leslie9958 replied the topic: Overheating and vapor lock.
I know that the popular name of VAPOR LOCK is used over and over everywhere one goes but there is no real thing as vapor lock, it is a great misnomer in Automobile Lore. I first found out about this about 1948 when I purchased my first Motor Manual the one with the dark blue cover that falls off after about 50 years of heavy use. If one is very lucky and still has one that hasn?t been ruined by fuel injection information one can read about what so called vapor lock really is and follow with intelligent and appropriate action. Vapor can?t lock anything if one analyzes it!

Carburetor heat is there for a purpose and that is to prevent ?The Latent Heat of Evaporation? from freezing up the carburetor in the winter in particular. That is why aircraft have very careful instructions to pilots about this phenomenon. Icing up of carburetors in aircraft can KILL pilot?s crew, and passengers in aircraft. Fortunately cars can pull over to the side of the road when and if this happens. A lot of old time cars had the carburetor heat on the dash where one could pull or push it off and on as needed. Carburetor heat is there for a purpose. Remember Lycoming is and was an aircraft engine manufacturer. I don?t know how long they have been in business but it?s a long time and they have probably seen about every thing that can happen to a piston engine.

The V-8 is actually two engines sitting at 90-degree angle and the two sides are separated and the flow in one side is not the same as the other. Note that the Ford V-8 of the 1932 to 19?? Flathead had two thermostats built in it at the factory. Vic Edelbrock found this out back in the forties when racing the V-8 Sixty in Midgets racecars.
He substituted flat washers with appropriate sized holes in either side of the two cylinders heads or at least that is the story told about him. I would examine carefully the thermostats and see if they have small bypass holes in them as this is to allow a small amount of coolant to bypass the thermostat and allow the hot coolant to get up to the thermostat and to allow it to open at the proper time and temperature. The best place to find out about this is to talk to an old time Ford flathead man. Also remember that a Cord engine is still a complicated flathead engine.

Also remember that a lot of new engines such a the Toyota and others are Aluminum blocks and cylinders heads see what kind of coolant they use and read the instructions on the side of the bottle of antifreeze coolant you intend to use it might tell you not to use it on and alloy block. The coolant that Toyota uses are red I believe and I don?t put any in myself.
Also has anyone tried to use a pressure cap at low pressures and overflow bottle see if the down tube is putting out exhaust gas as this implies a cracked block or head, gasket or something. The new cars don?t use those things for nothing as this would allow oxygen into the coolant and slowly corrode and eat the hell out of the aluminum and mess up the warranty and cost the manufacturer a lot of money. Well enough of this pontification and back to the engine firing order and stuff. Yours, M.L. Anderson

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04 Dec 2003 19:46 #1082 by leslie9958
leslie9958 replied the topic: Oxygen in the coolant
I was just reading an old Audels book and trying to see how the old cars fought the oxygen problem and they mentioned the air leaks on the intake side of the coolant pump. In new cars with pressure caps this is not a problem but in old cars without pressure caps it could be a very large problem. Old cars with ambient pressure caps could not cope with this. Just another problem for the Cords. M.L. Anderson

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04 Dec 2003 20:38 #1084 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic:
A few Cord owners have pressurized the cooling system. Those that I know of have limited this to 4 pounds, since the Cord radiator tanks were not intended to retain today's pressures of 15 pounds and more.

Jim Lawrence, winner of 2002's Wat Adams Award (for Cord driving) uses a Volvo overflow tank with a 4 pound cap on it, that both pressurizes the system and adds overflow protection. Your cooling system has to be airtight to do this. Not worth it unless you DRIVE. (Do it!)

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04 Dec 2003 20:50 #1085 by Josh Malks
Josh Malks replied the topic:
For M.L.: the Cord FB engine used a separate thermostat for each head too. The bellows element was located on the heat (hot) side, so no bleed hole was necessary. You can see this in the engine cross-section at
http://www.automaven.com/Technical/Engine/EngineX1.pdf

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Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

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