Freewheeling

  • MICHAEL S SMITH
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19 Mar 2004 21:19 #1452 by MICHAEL S SMITH
MICHAEL S SMITH replied the topic:
LEE
JUST LOOKED ON EBAY AND SAW THAT YOU BOUGHT YOUR CAR ON IT.
LOOKED LIKE GREAT BUY. SERIOUSLY CONSIDERED BUYING/BIDDING MYSELF.
GOOD LUCK
MIKE

MICHAEL S SMITH ACD LIFE MEMBER #40
851 auburn phaeton
851 auburn sedan
810 cord westchester
812 cord phaeton(ex Tressler Swiss)
812 cord custom s/c beverly
812 cord s/c cabriolet
812 cord s/c beverly
80 866 speedster (pray factory built)

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20 Mar 2004 01:08 #1455 by Mike Dube
Mike Dube replied the topic:
I find that the freewheeling can be shifted in and out quite smoothly w/o clutching with a little practice. I don't use it too much either, but do like everything on my cars to work. With most things mechanical, if you don't exercise them a bit now and then, pretty soon they don't work.

Mike
8-100A

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  • balinwire
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21 Mar 2004 03:10 #1465 by balinwire
balinwire replied the topic: Auburn economy run
With today?s modern glass fiber body parts and aluminum flashlights and wonderful polished tools it is difficult to remember when there were few paved roads and no interstate high speed highways.

When Henry Ford?s wife saw his first car she asked him why the tires were so narrow. He replied, ? You have never seen a fat racehorse!?. What is forgotten is there was a time when economy was important. Before modern oil well drilling crude could bring 300 dollars a barrel. The first automobiles had small engines with no more than four cylinders.

Soon six?s appeared and economy was still on people?s minds. <Difficult to believe in today?s fuel guzzling economy. > The manufacturers had three speed transmissions and soon added overdrives for higher cruising speeds. The speeds traveled were very slow by today?s standards. It was something for a vehicle to do a mile a minute!

Lets say we put the family in the car and travel from Los Angles to Santa Barbara in 1938. The roads would be maybe a narrow two lane with some slight grades. The engine would work pulling the grade and when at the peak and rolling downhill, with freewheeling disengaging the entire drive train, the only resistance would be the tires and wheel-bearing load. Incredible economy could be achieved. You would have no engine braking but there would be nothing in your way and you could roll for miles.

Remember that there was no air conditioning, power steering, or many accessories to strain the small motor then. It is a little unnerving to drive one of these freewheeling jobs on today?s interstates and hoping there are no sudden traffic stops, but there were no power brakes and most fast stops were white knucklers anyway.

I have a Studebaker overdrive with freewheeling on a 1939GMC with a 220 six. I installed a Winfield carburetor that has no accelerator pump and if it had a little better wind resistance and less weight it would probably be one of the most efficient engine transmission I have owned. It has traveled 295 miles on a tank that only holds 10 gallons. Not bad for a carryall truck. Now I would not try that nowadays as it is at a speed of less than 50 miles per hour. With emission controls this would not be possible in today?s cars but an Auburn with freewheeling would be a wonderful thing, just what the factory ordered.

The Cord I have has very high gearing with the 1936 drive unit. They lowered the ratio for 1937 as it was to high. An owner of a high-powered Cord in those days would not be interested in economy I suppose, only going fast.

Freewheeling is an item that is not well remembered but a very nice option and I would recommend keeping it intact. Another option that you may remember is the ?hill holder? brake applier. This is an option you may want to defeat.

Thank the Lord for E.L. Cord!

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