Water pump lubrication

  • Curti
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18 Aug 2003 15:01 #649 by Curti
Curti replied the topic: Waterpump / footman loops
I can understand some late 36's not having those footman loops.
but a 34 ??? They are in the Auburn parts book. I hold mine in with #8 machine screws. If you are going to get your waterpump machined give me a call evenings 715-262-3183
Cheers
Curt

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18 Aug 2003 21:02 #653 by PushnFords
PushnFords replied the topic: Water Pump Rebuilding
I assume that there is going to be a bit of machining to change the pump to modern bearings and a seal. I'll be looking for a shop that can do the work in my area.

Auburn/Cord Parts in Wellington, KS rebuilds pumps with modern parts all the time. Might check with them.

Derek

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18 Aug 2003 21:03 #654 by PushnFords
PushnFords replied the topic: Footman Loops
1935's didn't have the loops and they started production in '34. Many of the 1934's also didn't have them as they were phased out. If you car doesn't have them now, why alter something that is original?

Derek

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  • rfloch
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19 Aug 2003 04:44 #665 by rfloch
rfloch replied the topic:
Pushin,

That's a legitimate question. Here's my answer, you may have another.

I drive the car and have had the top down most of the summer. It doesn't have the best visibility over the back and it would be improved if I could compress the top even a little with tie-downs. Besides the lack of some footman loops on some of the cars sent out by the factory isn't, to me, an intentional change in design. It sounds like an oversight in assembly, or a weak attempt at cutting corners in its last years when the company was in financial trouble and Mr. Cord was off in England.

Richard Floch

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19 Aug 2003 12:17 #666 by PushnFords
PushnFords replied the topic: Footman Loops

rfloch wrote: Pushin,

That's a legitimate question. Here's my answer, you may have another.

I drive the car and have had the top down most of the summer. It doesn't have the best visibility over the back and it would be improved if I could compress the top even a little with tie-downs. Besides the lack of some footman loops on some of the cars sent out by the factory isn't, to me, an intentional change in design. It sounds like an oversight in assembly, or a weak attempt at cutting corners in its last years when the company was in financial trouble and Mr. Cord was off in England.


Sounds like you have a good reason then! I've been in many discussions about whether a car should be left 100% original or have modifications made to extend its service life or function. It is nice to keep it original but on the other hand if you can slightly modify it and have the car out being used more, then more people will see it and appreciate it. I didn't mean to sound so brisk in my last post - sorry! <!-- s:? --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_confused.gif" alt=":?" title="Confused" /><!-- s:? -->

Derek

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19 Aug 2003 16:35 #670 by rfloch
rfloch replied the topic:
No offense taken, certainly. We all try to maintain originality because, I think, we all know that we have been entrusted with a piece of history and have an obligation to the future to preserve that history.

I wonder sometimes what will happen to the old ones when new cars all run on hydrogen and there are no filling stations to dispense gasoline. I have a client with a genuine, unrestored 1870's stagecoach in his garage. The leather on the seats and boot and the harnesses are as brittle as paper and he just looks at it as it slowly decays because he can't exactly hook up a pair of horses and drive it on the street. Is that was is to become of most of the old classics now sequestered away in the garages of collectors?

You're right. It's important to drive them because the more people who see the early 20th Century classics and understand the greater intimacy they required between the machine and driver, the more they will appreciate this icon of the last century before it fades into the more distant past.

Richard Floch

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